We are each free to believe what we want, and it’s my view that the simplest explanation is there is no god. No one created our universe, and no one directs our fate. This leads me to a profound realization; There is probably no heaven, and no afterlife either. We have this one life to appreciate the grand design of the universe, and for that I am extremely grateful.
Stephen Hawking (via whats-out-there)

sci-universe:

One of the nicknames given to Mars by the ancient Egyptians was sekded-ef em khetkhet, which means “who travels backwards,” a clear reference to its apparent retrograde motion. It was mysterious to the early observers, but with our current understanding we know that this retrograde motion is entirely an illusion caused by the Earth passing the slower moving Mars, which has a larger orbit.
Image credit: Cenk E. Tezel & Tunc Tezel
Animation credit: Eugene Alvin Villar

questionscience:

NGC 1333, the complex nebula in Perseus, one of the nearest star forming regions

questionscience:

NGC 1333, the complex nebula in Perseus, one of the nearest star forming regions

sagansense:

It vexes me when they would constrain science by the authority of the Scriptures, and yet do not consider themselves bound to answer reason and experiment.

Nature is relentless and unchangeable, and it is indifferent as to whether its hidden reasons and actions are understandable to man or not.

By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox.

Facts which at first seem improbable will, even on scant explanation, drop the cloak which has hidden them and stand forth in naked and simple beauty.

I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the Scriptures, but with experiments, and demonstrations.

Galileo Galilei

How I feel about the person that fixes my python installations
fromquarkstoquasars:

First Ever Image of Orion (left) & Most Advanced Image Ever (right):Want to see how much technology has advanced in 100 years?Look no further…We recently posted an image of the Orion nebula across all our social media sites. This image compared the first ever photograph of Orion (taken in 1880) with an image taken in 2013 on an iPhone.Most people seemed to enjoy the comparison. However, there was a bit of a kerfuffle. Some people asserted that, to be accurate and fair, we should compare the most detailed image pf Orion with Draper’s image from 1880. Your wish is our command…. First ever image of Orion by Henry Draper in 1880 (left) and most detailed image of Orion ever taken (right). Image compiled by From Quarks to QuasarsRead more about this story at:http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/?p=28189

fromquarkstoquasars:

First Ever Image of Orion (left) & Most Advanced Image Ever (right):

Want to see how much technology has advanced in 100 years?
Look no further…

We recently posted an image of the Orion nebula across all our social media sites. This image compared the first ever photograph of Orion (taken in 1880) with an image taken in 2013 on an iPhone.

Most people seemed to enjoy the comparison. However, there was a bit of a kerfuffle. 

Some people asserted that, to be accurate and fair, we should compare the most detailed image pf Orion with Draper’s image from 1880. Your wish is our command…. 

First ever image of Orion by Henry Draper in 1880 (left) and most detailed image of Orion ever taken (right). Image compiled by From Quarks to Quasars

Read more about this story at:
http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/?p=28189

astronomybird:

Comet Jacques, Heart and Soul

Just spent 30mins trying to find it in vain… Clouds.

astronomybird:

Comet Jacques, Heart and Soul

Just spent 30mins trying to find it in vain… Clouds.

thenewenlightenmentage:

Traces of One of Universe’s First Stars Detected
n ancient star in the halo surrounding the Milky Way galaxy appears to contain traces of material released by the death of one of the universe’s first stars, a new study reports.
The chemical signature of the ancient star suggests that it incorporated material blasted into space by a supernova explosion that marked the death of a huge star in the early universe — one that may have been 200 times more massive than the sun.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Traces of One of Universe’s First Stars Detected

n ancient star in the halo surrounding the Milky Way galaxy appears to contain traces of material released by the death of one of the universe’s first stars, a new study reports.

The chemical signature of the ancient star suggests that it incorporated material blasted into space by a supernova explosion that marked the death of a huge star in the early universe — one that may have been 200 times more massive than the sun.

Continue Reading

M38 - Open Cluster in Auriga

The third and final, M38 is reasonably diffuse open cluster in the constellation Auriga. Discovered by Giovanni Batista Hodierna before 1654 and later catalogued by Charles Messier in 1764, M38 is of an intermediate age. A notable feature of the cluster is that the brightest stars seem to form a pattern similar to the Greek letter Pi - π. With smaller instruments, M38 may appear as a cross. And, as with many astronomical objects, larger telescopes show absolutely no geometrical shape. The larger the telescope, the more we can discover.

Top: Wide-Field - AstroLab

Bottom: Close-Up - CWRU

When I read about the way in which library funds are being cut and cut, I can only think that American society has found one more way to destroy itself.
Isaac Asimov
alluringabyss:

The Orion’s Sword is an astronomical asterism in the constellation Orion. It comprises three stars (c, Theta, and Iota Orionis) under the prominent asterism, Orion’s Belt. M42, the Orion Nebula is located in the center. 

alluringabyss:

The Orion’s Sword is an astronomical asterism in the constellation Orion. It comprises three stars (cTheta, and Iota Orionis) under the prominent asterism, Orion’s Belt. M42, the Orion Nebula is located in the center. 

scinote:

Coming soon: SciNote.org, launched by entrop-e, shychemist, and geogallery, is Tumblr’s project for promoting science education around the world.

At SciNote, we believe that science shouldn’t just be reading about the ideas of people with PhDs and Nobel Prizes. We believe that science is an active process of asking questions and finding answers.
That’s why we, at SciNote, want to hear from you. We want to ponder the interesting questions you pose and get excited with you over the cool science you see in your world.
SciNote will feature the best of the Tumblr science community, and we will compile and publish the top posts from every year in the form of a magazine available both digitally and in print. Think of SciNote magazine as the Tumblr science magazine.
We hope to celebrate our launch by featuring some of the coolest science from around Tumblr. So before we launch SciNote, we would like to collect 25 science posts and/or questions from you, including:
the most interesting science news you have come across
questions you’ve always wanted to ask
fascinating facts that you’ve learned
pictures of nature and/or science that you’ve taken
cool research that you’ve participated in
any other science-related thing you’d like to tell us!

So please:
Submit posts or ask questions to be featured on our blog and for an opportunity to be published in SciNote magazine.
Follow our blog at SciNote.org.
Read more about our project here.
If you’re interested, apply to join our staff here.
Reblog this post so that we can collect 25 posts and launch our project as soon as possible!
Thank you all and happy science!

scinote:

Coming soon: SciNote.org, launched by entrop-e, shychemist, and geogallery, is Tumblr’s project for promoting science education around the world.

At SciNote, we believe that science shouldn’t just be reading about the ideas of people with PhDs and Nobel Prizes. We believe that science is an active process of asking questions and finding answers.

That’s why we, at SciNote, want to hear from you. We want to ponder the interesting questions you pose and get excited with you over the cool science you see in your world.

SciNote will feature the best of the Tumblr science community, and we will compile and publish the top posts from every year in the form of a magazine available both digitally and in print. Think of SciNote magazine as the Tumblr science magazine.

We hope to celebrate our launch by featuring some of the coolest science from around Tumblr. So before we launch SciNote, we would like to collect 25 science posts and/or questions from you, including:

  • the most interesting science news you have come across
  • questions you’ve always wanted to ask
  • fascinating facts that you’ve learned
  • pictures of nature and/or science that you’ve taken
  • cool research that you’ve participated in
  • any other science-related thing you’d like to tell us!

So please:

  1. Submit posts or ask questions to be featured on our blog and for an opportunity to be published in SciNote magazine.
  2. Follow our blog at SciNote.org.
  3. Read more about our project here.
  4. If you’re interested, apply to join our staff here.
  5. Reblog this post so that we can collect 25 posts and launch our project as soon as possible!

Thank you all and happy science!

European Probe Survives Daring Dive Through Venus Atmosphere

Just recently, the ESA’s Venus Express probe was launched into the venutian atmosphere in order to collect much desired data about the atmosphere on Venus.

This is particularly interesting data because Venus shouldn’t have an atmosphere. Both Mercury and Mars have had their atmospheres stripped by the solar wind or condensed into permafrost. This is because they are small planets and cooled down quickly, loosing their dynamo, which is the mechanism needed to produce and maintain a planetary magnetic field. Venus, however, does not show evidence of a dynamo nor a magnetic field. It is thought that the planet staves off atmospheric obliteration because of the thickness of it’s atmosphere, rich in heavy elements like nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The atmosphere also has a super-fast rotation rate, with winds blowing up to 60 times the rotation rate of the planet itself.

From Space.com:

Specifically, Venus Express found that, between altitudes of 81 and 103 miles (130 to165 km), the atmospheric pressure increased by a factor of 1,000. Also, during several brief periods lasting 100 seconds each, temperatures increased by more than 212 degrees Fahrenheit (100 degrees Celsius), researchers said.

Read more at Space.com!

s-c-i-guy:

Bill Nye Fights Back
How a mild-mannered children’s celebrity plans to save science in America—or go down swinging.
Read the full article on Popular Science

s-c-i-guy:

Bill Nye Fights Back

How a mild-mannered children’s celebrity plans to save science in America—or go down swinging.

Read the full article on Popular Science

venusianw:

Sailing Past Neptune’s Moon Triton (NASA JPL)

Sail past Neptune’s moon Triton, with data obtained from NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1989. The historical footage has been restored and used to construct the best-ever global color map of the strange moon.

A really nice use of old Voyager 2 data, which on August 25 will be 25 years old. The Voyager photographs were reprocessed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and certainly blows away my attempts at playing around with the data recently. This isn’t *quite* true color - the saturation has been turned up a little bit to show small differences in terrain color.