physicistsneedlovetoo:

nihilsupernum:

methdragon:

science side of tumblr where do babies come from

Maybe you should ask your mother.

aldoclemens:

An amazing, billion-year show: a dance of half a trillion stars 
gravitationalbeauty:

Dust Sculptures in the Rosette Nebula
pixelthatlived:

An alkaseltzer in
SPAAAAAACEEEEEEE

pixelthatlived:

An alkaseltzer in

SPAAAAAACEEEEEEE

The most terrifying fact about the universe is not that it is hostile but that it is indifferent; but if we can come to terms with this indifference and accept the challenges of life within the boundaries of death—however mutable man may be able to make them—our existence as a species can have a genuine meaning and fulfillment. However vast the darkness, we must supply our own light.
Stanley Kubrick (via purplebuddhaproject)
historicaltimes:

Buzz Aldrin’s self-portrait during Gemini 12 with the Earth reflecting off his visor, 12 November 1966

historicaltimes:

Buzz Aldrin’s self-portrait during Gemini 12 with the Earth reflecting off his visor, 12 November 1966

kenobi-wan-obi:

Windmill Galaxy by Fred Espenak


  The brightest part of the autumn Milky Way appears in the southwest during the early evening hours. It includes the brighter summer constellations of Scorpius, and Sagittarius. A lone windmill is silhouetted in the foreground.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Windmill Galaxy by Fred Espenak

The brightest part of the autumn Milky Way appears in the southwest during the early evening hours. It includes the brighter summer constellations of Scorpius, and Sagittarius. A lone windmill is silhouetted in the foreground.

kenobi-wan-obi:

HiRISE Updates

Dramatic Dune Destination

This image of a sand dune field in a Southern highlands crater was acquired when the Sun was just 5 degrees above the horizon. As a result, the image is mostly shadows, with sharply-delineated dune crests sticking up into the sunlight.

The especially bright patches—bluish in enhanced color—are due to seasonal frost that is accumulating as this hemisphere approaches winter.

A Complex Valley Network Near Idaeus Fossae

Many valleys occur all over Mars that reveal an extensive ancient history of liquid water erosion. While these valley systems are typically now covered with fine soils and sand dunes, the overall scale and shape of the valleys reveals much about the ancient climate.

Ejecta in Excess

When impact craters are formed, the material that once resided in the subsurface is blown upward and outward.

This material falls back and settles around the newly formed crater into what is called an “ejecta blanket.” It often appears as a layer on top of the original surface extending radially outward from the crater.

Craters within Craters

Sandwiched between a crater nearly 4 kilometer across and a much larger and older crater over 15-kilometers in diameter is this small impact crater with light-toned material exposed in its ejecta.

scienceisbeauty:

19 Portugal Place Cambridge
19 March ’53

My Dear Michael,

Jim Watson and I have probably made a most important discovery. We have built a model for the structure of de-oxy-ribose-nucleic-acid (read it carefully) called D.N.A. for short. You may remember that the genes of the chromosomes —…

zerostatereflex:

NASA’s Starshade

This animation shows the prototype starshade, a giant structure designed to block the glare of stars so that future space telescopes can take pictures of planets.”

(That last GIF is a prototype,..it’s like we’re using the natural mechanics of flower petals for space..so awesome.)

One day this may be used to take the first picture of another Earth. 

Education is what people do to you, learning is what you do to yourself.

MIT Media Lab director Joi Ito at #TED2014. Pair with this excellent read on how to fuel the lifelong engine of learning beyond formal education.   (via educationalliberty)

Well if that doesn’t hit the nail on the proverbial head, I don’t know what does. Let’s be learning facilitators, not educators.

(via jtotheizzoe)

mucholderthen:

TOP RESEARCHERS COMMENT AS THE “GRAVITATIONAL WAVE REVOLUTION”  RIPPLES THROUGH THE SCIENTIFIC COMMUNITY
Nature | News by Ron Cowen  || 18 March 2014

The evidence of gravitational waves from the early Universe found by researchers working at the South Pole has been hailed as a landmark discovery in cosmology, astronomy and physics. The announcement was made by astronomer John Kovac on 17 March at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts. … Here Nature has collected reactions from leading researchers.

Please go to the open access article in Nature to read the comments (and see who made them) …

‒ “… many great intellectual discoveries are never confirmed at the time when the authors are still alive. I’m not dead yet and they are already seeing this gravitational-wave signal.” [Comment from one of the discoverers/creators of the theory of cosmic inflation]

‒ “Nobel prize material, no question. It’s not everyday that you wake up and learn something fundamentally new about the Universe, a telegram from the very earliest moments of the Universe.  … just in time for the one-hundredth birthday of Einstein’s general [theory of] relativity next year.”

‒ “If the BICEP2 result holds up, this is really big — as important as the discovery of dark energy, cosmic microwave background anisotropy or the Higgs boson. …”
______________________________

Top  Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, with the BICEP2 telescope on the right. [Robert Schwarz/University of Minnesota]
Middle/Bottom: credit: BICEP2 Collaboration / Nature Magazine, 17 March 2014

asapscience:

Confused? This is tough stuff. But we love this explanation by Phil Plait by Slate: http://slate.me/1ifqsOW

asapscience:

Confused? This is tough stuff. 

But we love this explanation by Phil Plait by Slate: http://slate.me/1ifqsOW