space-pics:

45 years ago today the Apollo 11 crew took off for the moon.http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

space-pics:

45 years ago today the Apollo 11 crew took off for the moon.
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Meanwhile in a Python Coding Tutorial…

The prompt asked to fill a list called suitcase:

There are 4 items in the suitcase.
['sunglasses', 'Higgs Boson', 'Phonons Everywhere', 'Not Tachyons']
None

I think Prof. Higgs might have been on a vacation to CERN…


starwalkapp:

The Space Station Captures a Dragon Capsulehttp://1.usa.gov/VRFiVf

starwalkapp:

The Space Station Captures a Dragon Capsule
http://1.usa.gov/VRFiVf

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.
 Richard Feynman (via ucsciencetoday)
Using the chain rule is like peeling an onion. You have to deal with every layer at a time and if it’s too big you’ll start crying.
Calculus professor (via mathprofessorquotes)
thenewenlightenmentage:

Researchers propose a new theory of star formation
Researchers at the California Institute of Technology in the US have discovered that one in every 10,000 stars may be made out of metal.
Astrophysicist Philip Hopkins and his team decided to analyse how a phenomena of turbulence called preferential concentration affects star formation. 
Prefential concentration affects the way dense particles cluster, and it has been shown to have an influence in almost everything, from aerosol production to rain formation.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Researchers propose a new theory of star formation

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology in the US have discovered that one in every 10,000 stars may be made out of metal.

Astrophysicist Philip Hopkins and his team decided to analyse how a phenomena of turbulence called preferential concentration affects star formation. 

Prefential concentration affects the way dense particles cluster, and it has been shown to have an influence in almost everything, from aerosol production to rain formation.

Continue Reading

abcstarstuff:

NEXT-GENERATION DARK MATTER EXPERIMENTS GET THE GREEN LIGHT

Berkeley Lab to lead new underground project in hunt for dark matter.

Last week, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science and the National Science Foundation announced support for a suite of upcoming experiments to search for dark matter that will be many times more sensitive than those currently deployed.

These so-called Generation 2 Dark Matter Experiments include the LUX-Zeplin (LZ) experiment, an international collaboration formed in 2012, managed by DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab) and to be located at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota. With the announcement, the DOE and NSF officially endorsed LZ and two other dark matter experiments.

"The great news is we’ve been given the go-ahead," says William Edwards, LZ project manager and engineer in Berkeley Lab Physics Division. "We’re looking forward to making what has been a proposal into a real, operational, first-rate experiment."

The LZ experiment was first proposed two years ago to search for and advance our understanding of dark matter, a mysterious substance that makes up roughly 27 percent of the universe. The experiment will build on the current dark matter experiment at SURF called the Large Underground Xenon detector, or LUX.

Dark matter, so named because it doesn’t emit or absorb light, leaves clues about its presence via gravity: it affects the orbital velocities of galaxies in clusters and distorts light emitted from background objects in a phenomenon known as gravitational lensing. But direct detection of dark matter has so far been elusive.

Physicists believe dark matter could be made of difficult-to-detect particles called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles or WIMPs, which usually pass through ordinary matter without leaving a trace. The current LUX experiment consists of a one-third ton liquid xenon detector that sits deep underground where it is shielded from cosmic rays and poised to find WIMPs. When one of these particles passes through the xenon detector, it should occasionally produce an observable flash of light. 

"When completed, the LZ experiment will be the world’s most sensitive experiment for WIMPs over a large range of WIMP masses," says Harry Nelson, physicist at the University of California, Santa Barbara and current spokesperson of the LZ Collaboration. The international LZ collaboration includes scientists and engineers from 29 institutions in the United States, Portugal, Russia and the United Kingdom.

The next-generation detector, LZ, will consist of a 7-ton liquid xenon target and an active system for suppressing the rate of non-WIMP signals known as background events, both located inside the same water – tank shield used by LUX. This significant increase in detection capability will increase the sensitivity to WIMPs by more than a hundred times.

Another DOE- and NSF-approved project called SuperCDMS-SNOLAB will also be looking for WIMPs, but with a focus on those that are lighter and less energetic than those primarily detectable by the LZ detector. A third project called ADMX-Gen2 is tuned specifically for axions, and will watch for them by monitoring signals stimulated by a strong magnetic field.

"By picking a combination of these WIMP detection techniques that balance the potential sensitivity, the technical readiness, and the cost, the idea is to have the broadest dark-matter detection program possible," says Murdock "Gil" Gilchriese, LZ project scientist and physicist in Berkeley Lab’s Physics Division.

"This is great news in the hunt for dark matter," says Kevin Lesko, senior physicist with LUX/LZ, SURF operations manager and from Berkeley Lab’s Physics Division. "With our new detector at SURF, we plan on getting the experiment up and running by 2018 and will continue searching with LUX in the interim."

abcstarstuff:

NEXT-GENERATION DARK MATTER EXPERIMENTS GET THE GREEN LIGHT

Berkeley Lab to lead new underground project in hunt for dark matter.

Last week, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science and the National Science Foundation announced support for a suite of upcoming experiments to search for dark matter that will be many times more sensitive than those currently deployed.

These so-called Generation 2 Dark Matter Experiments include the LUX-Zeplin (LZ) experiment, an international collaboration formed in 2012, managed by DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab) and to be located at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota. With the announcement, the DOE and NSF officially endorsed LZ and two other dark matter experiments.

"The great news is we’ve been given the go-ahead," says William Edwards, LZ project manager and engineer in Berkeley Lab Physics Division. "We’re looking forward to making what has been a proposal into a real, operational, first-rate experiment."

The LZ experiment was first proposed two years ago to search for and advance our understanding of dark matter, a mysterious substance that makes up roughly 27 percent of the universe. The experiment will build on the current dark matter experiment at SURF called the Large Underground Xenon detector, or LUX.

Dark matter, so named because it doesn’t emit or absorb light, leaves clues about its presence via gravity: it affects the orbital velocities of galaxies in clusters and distorts light emitted from background objects in a phenomenon known as gravitational lensing. But direct detection of dark matter has so far been elusive.

Physicists believe dark matter could be made of difficult-to-detect particles called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles or WIMPs, which usually pass through ordinary matter without leaving a trace. The current LUX experiment consists of a one-third ton liquid xenon detector that sits deep underground where it is shielded from cosmic rays and poised to find WIMPs. When one of these particles passes through the xenon detector, it should occasionally produce an observable flash of light.

"When completed, the LZ experiment will be the world’s most sensitive experiment for WIMPs over a large range of WIMP masses," says Harry Nelson, physicist at the University of California, Santa Barbara and current spokesperson of the LZ Collaboration. The international LZ collaboration includes scientists and engineers from 29 institutions in the United States, Portugal, Russia and the United Kingdom.

The next-generation detector, LZ, will consist of a 7-ton liquid xenon target and an active system for suppressing the rate of non-WIMP signals known as background events, both located inside the same water – tank shield used by LUX. This significant increase in detection capability will increase the sensitivity to WIMPs by more than a hundred times.

Another DOE- and NSF-approved project called SuperCDMS-SNOLAB will also be looking for WIMPs, but with a focus on those that are lighter and less energetic than those primarily detectable by the LZ detector. A third project called ADMX-Gen2 is tuned specifically for axions, and will watch for them by monitoring signals stimulated by a strong magnetic field.

"By picking a combination of these WIMP detection techniques that balance the potential sensitivity, the technical readiness, and the cost, the idea is to have the broadest dark-matter detection program possible," says Murdock "Gil" Gilchriese, LZ project scientist and physicist in Berkeley Lab’s Physics Division.

"This is great news in the hunt for dark matter," says Kevin Lesko, senior physicist with LUX/LZ, SURF operations manager and from Berkeley Lab’s Physics Division. "With our new detector at SURF, we plan on getting the experiment up and running by 2018 and will continue searching with LUX in the interim."

colliderblog:

The film Particle Fever officially hits VOD, available to watch on Netflix and others.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jesse-damiani/particle-fever-hits-vod-h_b_5585844.html

This summer may pack plenty of silver-screen explosions, but how many of them tell you what you’re made of? In the heat of the blockbuster season we find an altogether different kind of explosion: Particle Fever, the definitive documentary on the Large Hadron Collider and our search for the Higgs boson (the “God particle”), premieres today on all major VOD platforms, including Netflix.
For its outwardly complicated subject, the documentary takes a clean, narrative focus, centering on the lives and personalities of its protagonists — six scientists working in different arms of the experiment — letting the practical information and tech specs flow from the human vantage point. You rarely find complex science presented in such a compelling, approachable way; we’re talking, after all, about the biggest, most expensive, and arguably most important scientific undertaking in human history, a machine that synthesizes the expertise of thousands of the world’s leading minds in particle physics. The result is an exciting glimpse into this moment of discovery: our attempts to discover what we’re made of, where we come from, and where we’re heading.

colliderblog:

The film Particle Fever officially hits VOD, available to watch on Netflix and others.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jesse-damiani/particle-fever-hits-vod-h_b_5585844.html

This summer may pack plenty of silver-screen explosions, but how many of them tell you what you’re made of? In the heat of the blockbuster season we find an altogether different kind of explosion: Particle Fever, the definitive documentary on the Large Hadron Collider and our search for the Higgs boson (the “God particle”), premieres today on all major VOD platforms, including Netflix.

For its outwardly complicated subject, the documentary takes a clean, narrative focus, centering on the lives and personalities of its protagonists — six scientists working in different arms of the experiment — letting the practical information and tech specs flow from the human vantage point. You rarely find complex science presented in such a compelling, approachable way; we’re talking, after all, about the biggest, most expensive, and arguably most important scientific undertaking in human history, a machine that synthesizes the expertise of thousands of the world’s leading minds in particle physics. The result is an exciting glimpse into this moment of discovery: our attempts to discover what we’re made of, where we come from, and where we’re heading.

Off to bed because I want to be up for the NASA Cygnus Cargo ISS docking tomorrow morning at 5:15 EDT!

Come join hundreds of spectators at NASA TV:

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/schedule.html#.U8X4rrE4o_o

And in case you missed the launch:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/14/cygnus-spacecraft-launch-iss-video_n_5582386.html

zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission 
"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission

"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

Seeing Double: Summer’s Binary Stars

Years ago, my younger daughter Maria and I camped in northern Minnesota. One chilly evening in August during the Perseid meteor shower, we built a big fire and stretched out on our backs next to it to stay warm.

Vega beamed down from overhead, and next to it, the famous double-double star, Epsilon Lyrae. I asked my daughter and her young eyes to see if she could split the wider pair, Epsilon1 and Epsilon2. She looked for a minute and then said: “Sure, Dad, one is right above the other” — then she added, “Can’t you?”

Read more…
Ever looked at the sky and thought “wait, isn’t there two stars?” Well you might just be right! The summer sky is host to some of the best double star systems visible without a telescope. Bring along some binoculars if you’re thinking about heading outside tonight - and read this article!
Photo Credit: Bob King (left) / ESO Digitized Survey (right)

ohstarstuff:

Massive Meteorite Discovered on Mars

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has discovered its first meteorite on the Red Planet. Named “Lebanon”, it is 7 nearly feet wide and made of iron. The picture on top was made by combining high-resolution circular images (outlined in white) acquired with the Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) of Curiosity’s ChemCam instrument with color and context from the rover’s Mastcam.

The second image shows three meteorites on the Martian surface from a distance, including Lebanon.

Iron meteorites are not rare among meteorites found on Earth, but they are less common than stony meteorites. On Mars, iron meteorites dominate the small number of meteorites that have been found. Part of the explanation could come from the resistance of iron meteorites to erosion processes on Mars. 


(Credit: NASA/JPL Caltech/LANL/CNES/IRAP/LPGNantes/CNRS/IAS/MSSS)

s-c-i-guy:


South Pole of Neptune
The South Pole of Neptune as taken by Voyager 2
source

s-c-i-guy:

South Pole of Neptune

The South Pole of Neptune as taken by Voyager 2

source

Citizen Science - Get Involved with Galaxy Zoo

image

image

Modern Astronomy has produced so much data that astrophysicists are having a difficult time working through it all, and that’s why we need YOU.

The Galaxy Zoo project was launched in 2007 to open up the world of galactic science to everybody! Whether you’re an artist, writer, teacher, scientist, whatever - you can help. All you have to do is answer a few questions about a REAL IMAGE of a galaxy. Not only do you get to look at some of the most distant places in the universe, you also get to help humanity to better understand the universe!

Help science today!

http://www.galaxyzoo.org/#/classify

photo credit: NASA and Galaxy Zoo