What is a God? (feat. Jason Silva)

Presented by MelodySheep

The Story of Everything: Carl Sagan on Cosmology, Evolution, and Science

Via The Carl Sagan Tribute Series

Why Science and Creativity go Hand in Hand.

We must stop teaching people to fear being wrong. And you may not think we are doing it as a society, but really think about it. In school, for instance, you always were told you need to get good grades. So what? Well, if you don’t, you’re not going to get into college and then you’re going to end up with no job, homeless, unloved, and alone. And it’s all driven by fear. The fear of being wrong.

But if you are not willing to be wrong, then you have never dreamt of something different, never considered a new angle, never changed anything. And if you are a scientist, you understand the necessity of being wrong, of taking a risk, of trying something new. We say, for example, that as you look outwards from the surface of the sun, it gets hotter and hotter, and no one knows why! So a graduate of so and so university might say “well, I was taught under the instruction of so and so and he told me that it was all caused by this heating or that cooling” or whatever have you. And then someone on the street might come along and propose an entirely different idea – something new, something untested, something completely unheard of. Let’s say he or she says that it was a magical elephant that makes this area hotter and hotter. Well the student is obviously going to reject it right away! “no, no it cannot be correct, it cannot be the correct answer” and in doing so he forgets the whole point of science – to never fear that you might be wrong – to always consider the other side.

But that is the only way we move forward. And that’s not what colleges are teaching us. That’s not what society thinks is important. And because of that we are right here, in the present day, motionless on a sea of ideas, our fishing reels pushed aside, and our minds turned towards old ideas and ways of doing. Our heads are stuck in the books. And sometimes someone decides to take up a reel – may I remind you it’s always there – and takes a cast, takes a risk. That person is a true scientist, that person isn’t afraid of trying something new, that person isn’t afraid of being wrong.

And so you see, science needs more imagination, more new ideas, and more risk-takers. We need a generation of men and women who are not afraid of being wrong. A generation that sees science as a grand adventure, full of wonder and beauty and hope. 

1st Observing Night at the University of St Andrews Observatory

Clear skies, but a bright near-full moon. Saw a few deep-sky objects, gave multiple sky tours, and shared two binary star systems though a scope. I was so happy to see so many faces turn up for the event, especially considering the range of majors in the crowd.


Oh, and I was elected to the committee board of the University of St Andrews Astronomical Society as 1st Year Representative!

slenderica:

firstruleofmethclub:

Left and right are both directions. The difference between them is that when facing due North, your former will be to the West, and your latter will fall on the East. Remember which half of your body was placed in each quadrant, and you will be able to know the difference between your left and right, this works even after you discontinue facing North.
Red is the light reflecting visual representation shared by both blood, and my blankie. It’s also the opposite of green.
The new colour is called Banewolf. I may not have been able to visualise it, but I did just think of it, which was the only prerequisite.
Pure water doesn’t stimulate any of the varying taste sensations, neither does it effect the sense of smell. So this is basically like asking “What is breathing oxygen unassisted in outer space like” knowing full well humans can’t breathe there. However, almost all water you’ve ever drunk has been tainted by something else; tannin, fluoride, minerals, blahblahblah, it depends on where you are. You simply become accustomed to that water so you no longer taste the additional properties. This is why when you go to a different area and drink tap water, sometimes it tastes bad. Or why if you are used to drinking rain water, tap/bore is disgusting to you. It’s not the actual water, it’s the tiny little extra bits you are tasting.



I can do the color. That is, if you speak SCIENCE! 
Red: Color. Approximately 620-750nm wavelength
There you go. 
Science.

slenderica:

firstruleofmethclub:

Left and right are both directions. The difference between them is that when facing due North, your former will be to the West, and your latter will fall on the East. Remember which half of your body was placed in each quadrant, and you will be able to know the difference between your left and right, this works even after you discontinue facing North.

Red is the light reflecting visual representation shared by both blood, and my blankie. It’s also the opposite of green.

The new colour is called Banewolf. I may not have been able to visualise it, but I did just think of it, which was the only prerequisite.

Pure water doesn’t stimulate any of the varying taste sensations, neither does it effect the sense of smell. So this is basically like asking “What is breathing oxygen unassisted in outer space like” knowing full well humans can’t breathe there. However, almost all water you’ve ever drunk has been tainted by something else; tannin, fluoride, minerals, blahblahblah, it depends on where you are. You simply become accustomed to that water so you no longer taste the additional properties. This is why when you go to a different area and drink tap water, sometimes it tastes bad. Or why if you are used to drinking rain water, tap/bore is disgusting to you. It’s not the actual water, it’s the tiny little extra bits you are tasting.

I can do the color. That is, if you speak SCIENCE!

Red: Color. Approximately 620-750nm wavelength

There you go.

Science.

Eminent psychologist Nicholas Humphrey has written of the biological advantage of being awe-struck. How fortuitous, he says, for a species to find its own ability to contemplate, to marble at its own existence has been evolutionary advantageous. In other words, it has been biologically selected for, because it informs our life with sense of cosmic significance, that makes us work harder, to persist, and to survive. In other words, “awe” has helped us to survive. And you know, a recent study out of Stanford University kind of validates this idea. They found that regular incidence of awe leave residual benefits upon the individual that persists, such as increased feelings of empathy and compassion towards others, increased feelings of altruism, increased feeling of general well-being. In this study, they define “awe” as experience of such perceptual expansion. Such perceptual vastness literally have to re-configure, upgrade your mental schematic, just to accommodate, just to take in the scale of the experience.
Jason Silva - The Biological Advantage of Being Awestruck

Neil deGrasse Tyson - Caught on Camera

Neil deGrasse Tyson on whether to be amazed or terrified by the universe

Our closest stellar neighbor, The Moon.


Photos taken with a Meade EXT90 mounted with a Nikon DSLR

Treworgy Planetarium at Mystic Seaport

Spitz A3P Star Projector

Prof. Brian Cox on the Role of Science in a Democracy

Source: Brandon Fibbs

Our Sun…on my ceiling.

Our Sun…on my ceiling.

Like a human going through a midlife crisis, an aging AGB star casts off much of the mass that it possesses and makes a cosmic spectacle of itself
My Astronomy Textbook (Universe - Freedman & Kaufmann)

Graphene: Created at the University of Manchester

Best ad that has ever been put in-front of a Youtube video. Awesome.

The danger of science denial - Michael Specter

 

you are entitled to your opinions, but not your facts, no.